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20121202
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relations effort continued today. vice president joe biden had lunch with middle class americans who will see their taxes go up if republicans refuse to extend 98% of the tax cuts before the end of the year. >> folks, this is not hard. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision is made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent the middle class tax cut. the president would probably have me sprint up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> vice president joe biden did not waver on the white house's position. it's all about the top tax rates. >> every serious economist i have spoken to, left, right, and center, knows you have to do something about revenue and rates. you can't get there from here without affecting these people around this table and all of the sudden going into the deductibility of health care in terms of their employment or fooling around with the mortgage deductions. you can't get there without the rates being affected. >> the white house is not backing down
biden put the pressure on boehner in the way that only joe biden can. >> folks, this is not hard. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision was made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent middle class tax cuts. the president would probably have me sprint up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> the president and the democrats have the poll numbers on their side. 53% of people approve of the job president obama is doing. 53% trust him to handle the negotiations while just 36% say they trust the republicans in congress. and 65% of voters are with the president on a sticking issue in these negotiations -- raising taxes on household income over 250,000. 31% oppose it. and today a new number is strengthening the president's position in the negotiations. the november jobs report shows the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%. the economy added 146,000 jobs last month, and that is one reason why today john boehner kind of, sort of maybe entertained the idea of giving p
president biden is having lunch with several middle class americans who would see their income taxes go up if the tax cuts are not extended. all of this comes as the first jobs report since the election exceeded expectations. the u.s. economy added some 146,000 jobs last month. that was enough it to drive the unemployment rate down to 7.7%. joining me to talk about all of it, florida congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz and she chairs the democratic national committee. good friday afternoon to you. >> thank you. >> john boehner said today that democrats' plan is to, quote, slow walk our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. how do you respond it to that? >> well, that's just utterly preposterous. the republicans right now in the house of representatives have a bill that would extend the middle class tax cuts right away that has passed the senate that they could take up next week when we come back. they could have already taken it up. we have a lot of time, and the republicans refuse to give certainty to the middle class. the president said he'd seen this bill right away, and then the
and women. back then, senator barack obama opposed the fcc's proposal. so did senators joe biden and hillary clinton. but now, president obama's man at the fcc -- they were friends in law school -- apparently wants to do what the republicans couldn't do under president bush, and to do it behind the scenes, out of sight, with no public hearings. several public interest groups, civil rights organizations and labor unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >>
not agree on much in the presidential race, but it's clear mitt romney and joe biden share a love of bargains, both of them shopping at costco recently. and the baltimore sun has this headline on their front page -- the storm caused $127 million of damage in maryland. now to republican caller in california, sandy. caller: i just went through an experience with my mother who went from the hospital to a nursing home and was told she could not have any rehabilitation services, that she was only allowed to stay in the nursing home seven days. then we had to make arrangements with hospice. they will all the paper that seven days. and she has to pay for everything else honor own. if hospice came to her house, she will have to pay. she paid into medicare many years. i think all seniors need to be aware and be prepared that this is what will happen to them. that's my experience. host: in philadelphia, rick is a democratic caller. caller: i cannot believe i got through. the last time i spoke with c- span was 2003. give me about a minute and 30 seconds. host: go! caller: i think barack obam
biden. the issue of the supplemental, i imagine, mr. speaker, the gentleman has seen the press reports that i have and that the white house is anticipating sending up a $60 billion supplemental request for damage related to sandy, and i think tomorrow would be that day. at least according to press reports. the gentleman may know that the fema director testified to the house yesterday that the agency can meet its need through the spring associated with the disaster. approximately $2 billion has been delivered with about $5 billion remaining in the disaster relief fund. so, again, no one is here saying we don't want to deliver the necessary aid to the victims because that is a priority. and -- but looking forward to receiving that request and taking a look at the numbers and the need to make sure we can move forward on that as well. and lastly, mr. speaker, postal reform. you know, the gentleman and i have, yes, talked about this a lot. know that the issue has to do with the obligations of the postal service and how we can address those to create a more balanced prospect for the future,
discussions in the biden group, my discussions at the white house a year and a half ago and for that matter, in the joint select committee. and if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, and our outline, i think he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. >> so that was speaker boehner obviously flanked by republicans. we'll get you that sound bite from the president because i want to make sure you hear both sides. here is the question i'm hearing people ask. if we go off the cliff here, how big of a hit will we take on taxs? stand by because i'm good to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, the fiscal policy reporter for the washington post. so, laurie, welcome to you here. and your paper this morning, you ran through a couple of tax scenarios which were pretty palletable so we want to show our view whaeers what you ran through. let me run through two. we'll look at this first one. so everybody take a look at this graphic. this is scenario number one, married couple, two kids, one in college, combined income of $137,000. you s
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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